About

(Photo by Halley Wolowiec)

 WHISKEY QUAKER PRESS is the e-book publishing concern of David Ellis Dickerson.net, created out of a belief that, despite what publishers and agents say, there is a market for spiritual satire that drinks and swears, but doesn’t slash and burn. Our motto, and our goal, is “every day slightly more pleasant,” and we’re glad you dropped by!

JOIN OUR MAILING LIST FOR A FREE SAMPLE OF OUR BOOKS! We promise to only write entertaining emails, and rarely more than two a month.

(WHY “WHISKEY QUAKER”? Because David is a Quaker who, in contrast to traditional Quaker teaching, believes that drinking alcohol is important. Religion is at its best when it breaks down purity rules and embraces human awkwardness.)

DAVID ELLIS DICKERSON is a writer, humorist, video blogger, teacher, editor, storyteller, and radio performer. He has a Ph.D. in American Lit/Creative Writing (Florida State, 2011), with special interest in the humorous essay, African-American literature, experimental fiction, and the possibilities of e-books. He seems to be more interested in funny/sarcastic feminism all the time.

RADIO PERFORMANCES: David is probably best known from his regular appearances on This American Life (including the episodes “Quiz Show,” “Ten Commandments,” “The Devil in Me,” “Social Engineering,” “Bait and Switch,” and “Know When to Fold ‘Em”). He has also appeared on Studio 360, Weekend Edition, and Talk of the Nation, and is hoping to slowly conquer all of public radio.

WRITING: David’s writing has appeared in The Atlantic Monthly, Story Quarterly, The Gettysburg Review, and Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror. In 2009, he released his greeting card memoir, House of Cards, which is currently in development as a sitcom with USA. He is now working on his next book, a road trip/travel narrative tentatively titled Tomorrow Might Suck Less. In the meantime, he’s also publishing with Whiskey Quaker Press.

STORYTELLING: An in-demand storyteller, David has performed many times for almost every major live show in New York City (The Moth, The Liar Show, Speakeasy, Kevin Allison’s Risk!, Stories from the Creek, It Came From New York), as well as performing readings for the Franklin Park Reading Series, Literary Death Match, and for Four Stories in Boston. He has also appeared on several storytelling podcasts such as The Moth (“A Flash of Hope”), Story Collider (“Innocence”) and the Risk! Podcast (“Spiritual Breakthroughs and Breakdowns”).

VIDEO PERFORMANCES: David produces and appears in his own videoblog series called “Greeting Card Emergency,” where he creates custom greeting cards for people in unusual situations, or writes specially themed greeting cards for various celebrities.  It was briefly picked up by Newsweek.com (where David then made cards according to situations in the news), and then Newsweek got bought by the Washington Post, the show was cancelled, and has been waiting to return ever since. So it’s back to the home-brewed version for now.

Several of his storytelling performances have been captured on video, including, most recently, his story for The Moth, “A Flash of Hope.” (Note that the story is NSFW, and also that he ditched the ill-fitting cowboy garb long ago, and would like to apologize for ever thinking it was a good idea.)

TEACHING & EDITING: He has six years of experience as a teacher of composition, creative writing, and African-American literature at FSU, where he was twice nominated for teaching awards. He has also edited literary magazines (The Sonora Review), commercial magazines (Dell Crosswords, Dell Logic Puzzles), and curriculum for the Navy’s PREVENT program. He is available for editing on, and consultation about, book-length manuscripts on a freelance basis.

One Response to About

  1. Glad to see your blog. I put you on my blogroll because I expect brilliance! No pressure.

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